Team NU Canada Games 2011: Louis Nutarariaq

Judo was created in Japan in the late 1800s. Since then, it has become a popular martial art and combat sport. In 1971, it became an official event at the Canada Winter Games, and it will be one of the exciting sports taking place at St.

Judo was created in Japan in the late 1800s. Since then, it has become a popular martial art and combat sport. In 1971, it became an official event at the Canada Winter Games, and it will be one of the exciting sports taking place at St. Mary’s University in Halifax from February 23 – 26 at the 2011 Canada Winter Games.

Representing Team Nunavut in the Individual Over 100 kg Male category is 19-year-old Louis Nutarariaq of Iqaluit. Competing in the heavyweight division may sound intimidating; however, Louis explains that judo is a martial art that is more centered on mental strength and technique than physical strength and size. “I’d say that it’s 80 per cent mental and 20 per cent physical,” he says. “I still get nervous before a big match, but I just take a deep breath and concentrate on what I’m going to do.”

Louis first started practicing judo at the age of 15 at the suggestion of a friend. He decided to Go For It and hasn’t looked back since.  “I got hooked immediately. I love to do sports and judo really interests me.”

Since starting judo, Louis has traveled across the country and achieved some impressive accomplishments. In only his second competition he won a gold medal at a tournament in Montreal and later he won a bronze medal in the Under 20 100-kg Class at the 2009 Canadian National Junior Judo Championships in Calgary.

At the Canada Games he will continue to strive for Excellence.  His current training routine involves anticipating opponents’ moves and practicing his technique. “I’m doing some practices on what I would like to do in the match and what the physical features of my opponents are going to be. Then I try to imitate that.”

Louis would like to stress that judo is a martial art that requires Respect for your opponents. It is about skill – not emotion. “You can’t let your temper get the best of you. This is a sport that requires discipline. If your emotions get a hold of you, you are going to start making mistakes and that is not what you want to do.” 

True Sport wishes Louis the best of success at the 2011 Canada Winter Games, and in the future!