Team NU Canada Games 2009: Levi Strauss

Though he has a well-known name, Nunavut wrestler Levi Strauss does not want to be confused with the brand-name apparel company – he plans to make his own mark on the world!

Though he has a well-known name, Nunavut wrestler Levi Strauss does not want to be confused with the brand-name apparel company – he plans to make his own mark on the world! In fact, Levi, also known as Qaqqasiq, has several names in keeping with Inuit tradition.

When 14-year-old Levi wrestles, he is guided by the True Sport Principle, Respect Others because he has a high regard for his teammates and his competitors. It’s a lesson he has learned from his family. “We try to instill respectfulness in our family,” says Palluq Enuaraq, Levi’s mother. “We’ve taught him to always try his best, but to always be respectful when doing so.”

He is inspired by his cousin and sport hero Luccassie Proctor. Levi looks up to Luccassie because he has a black belt in Jiu-Jitsu, and he is the first Inuk to achieve this level.

Levi has always been health conscious, and the weight requirement in wrestling helps him to focus on eating right and exercising. “Levi just started wrestling, but he has been active in judo for most of his life,” says his mother. “He still participates in judo twice a week, and that also helps him Stay Healthy.”

In July, Levi travelled to Calgary to attend the National Judo Championships, but the Canada Games is his first competition as a member of the Nunavut wrestling team. “My personal best result in wrestling came when I was selected for the team,” says Levi. “My goal at the Games is to have Fun and to learn how to become a better wrestler.”

“For athletes from up north, competing at the Canada Games is imperative to their development,” says Jeff Seetanak, chef de mission, Nunavut. “The Games offer our athletes a chance to compete at a higher level and to gauge how they are doing in comparison to athletes from around the country.”

Unfortunately, after months of preparation, at game time Levi was not able to compete given his doctor’s orders.

“Our team will play hard because they know where they are coming from, and when the Games are over they will have some applicable life experiences that they can use to improve their sport performance,” says Mr. Seetanak, chef de mission, Nunavut. “Though in the end Levi did not get a chance to compete, he still prepared for the Games, and he was chosen to be on the team because he demonstrates the quality sportsmanship and skills that team Nunavut is all about.” 

The True Sport Movement wishes Levi the best of success in the future and encourages him to continue having fun while staying healthy and respecting others as he makes a name for himself in wrestling!